Burns

According to the National SAFE KIDS Campaign, accidental injuries are a leading cause of death among children ages 14 and younger. And, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), burns and fires are the fifth most common cause of accidental death in children and adults, and account for an estimated 4,000 adult and child deaths per year. The key to reducing childhood burn injuries is prevention.

Picture of young girl

Burns destroy tissue. When skin is burned, it cannot prevent the entry of germs, prevent loss of body fluid, or control body temperature.

The severity of the burn depends on the depth of the burn; the size of the burn; the location of the burn; the age of the child; the source of the burn; and the health of the child prior to the burn injury.

To protect your child, it is important to understand the types of burns and the most common causes of burns. Practice fire safety and burn awareness at all times. Teach your children how to avoid sources of burns and what to do in the case of a fire. Should your child be burned, emergency care may be necessary.

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