Frequently Asked Questions

  1. How do I know if I or a loved one has an addiction?
  2. How do I know if I or someone I love needs treatment?
  3. I've heard that it's not safe to stop using abruptly. Why?
  4. What is treatment like?
  5. Does treatment work?
  6. What is your privacy policy?
  7. Is an individual at risk of losing his or her job if they seek treatment?
  8. Is the family involved?
  9. Is there support for individuals after the program is completed?
  10. Whom do you serve?
  11. How do I know if a treatment program is a good program?

How do I know if I or a loved one has an addiction?

An addiction is indicated when someone shows a pattern of continuing to use harmful substances or engage in compulsive behaviors (e.g. gambling, eating or sex) despite adverse consequences (e.g. legal issues, medical, social or job related problems).

[ Back to Top ]

How do I know if I or someone I love needs treatment?

Addiction is difficult to accept because it seems sporadic; it's under control at times. The key indicator is continuing to use despite negative consequences. These can include physical health, as well as problems at work and in family life related to drinking alcohol or using medication excessively. As addiction progresses, the negative incidents become more frequent and more serious.

[ Back to Top ]

I've heard that it's not safe to stop using abruptly. Why?

Treatment may begin with detoxification, sometimes called medical stabilization if the addict's physical health is impaired and if stopping use causes withdrawal. Medically supervised detox in a hospital or an inpatient treatment is usually very effective and lasts 3-4 days. Ambulatory detox is also available at many outpatient treatment programs under the supervision of a physician.

[ Back to Top ]

What is treatment like?

Treatment options include residential treatment at a specialized center where the patient will be supported and supervised by professional staff 24/7 for up to 4 weeks.

Outpatient treatment options include day hospital (spending a full day in a program) while living at home or in an alternative living environment, or intensive outpatient programs which are 3-4 hours a day, either during the day or evening. Treatment programs in any setting involve education sessions, 1:1 and family counseling sessions, group therapy with other patients and introduction to 12-step recovery programs.

[ Back to Top ]

Does treatment work?

Yes, structured treatment has very positive recovery rates, especially with family support. Addiction is a treatable disease. Discoveries in the science of addiction have led to medications that may help some people stop abusing drugs or alcohol and resume their productive lives. Combining treatment medications with behavioral therapy is the best way to ensure success for most patients. And, research is beginning to show that recovery of brain function may be possible with prolonged abstinence.

Although some addicts relapse after treatment, that doesn't mean that the treatment has failed. Similar to treatment for other chronic diseases, such as diabetes, heart disease or hypertension, addiction treatment involves changing deeply imbedded behaviors that are in part based on changes in the brain that have occurred during drug/alcohol use. For the addicted patient, lapses back to drug abuse indicate that treatment needs to be reinstated or adjusted, or that alternate treatment is needed.

[ Back to Top ]

What is your privacy policy?

Our program strictly follows the Federal Guidelines for Confidentiality. Information can and will be given only with direct written consent from a patient.

[ Back to Top ]

Is an individual at risk of losing his or her job if they seek treatment?

The biggest risk for job loss is continuing to use. During treatment, we are able to advocate and support the individual in returning to the workplace, usually with good results.

[ Back to Top ]

Is the family involved?

Yes. Individual sessions and a family program are available. Again, this can only occur with direct written consent from the individual.

[ Back to Top ]

Is there support for individuals after the program is completed?

Yes, 2 years of Continuing Care is part of the program. Also, with written consents, we recommend support from outside entities, such as employee or medical society assistance programs. A strong peer support system is also available.

[ Back to Top ]

Whom do you serve?

Resurrection Behavioral Health - Addiction Services offers treatment for all people with addictive illness. Most addicts are employed and have at least part of their treatment costs covered by health insurance. All educational and vocational groups are affected by this illness. Both men and women, teens through older adults are included.

[ Back to Top ]

How do I know if a treatment program is a good program?

One way to find a good program is to ask your doctor or health insurer if they know of one they would recommend. Most treatment programs will be happy answer questions over the phone, and most will provide a free screening interview so individuals can meet staff members and see the program setting.

[ Back to Top ]

Call 877-RES-INFO for Nurse Advice, Doctor Referrals or Class Registration Monday - Friday 8 am to 8 pm • Weekends 8 am to 4pm

Special Features

  • We need your voice!

    Our legislators are tackling issues that impact on our ability to live our mission. Learn more »